Interview with the Ottawa Citizen

You’d think a solo show would make life easier for a musician who spends most of his time travelling to gigs or recording in his basement.

Well, it hasn’t exactly worked out that way for Steve Hill. When the Montreal guitar hero released his first solo recording last year, the focus was on his whiskey-soaked voice and powerful playing, with accompaniment stripped back to bass drum and percussion. Continue reading

One Man Climbs A Hill

Montreal Blues Society contributor Sean Willoughby reviews Steve Hill’s solo show from March 29th in Repentigny. After seeing him headline at the One Man Band Festival in May, and again at the Tremblant Blues Festival last week, in show, and answering questions during the Sunday Workshop, we are looking forward to the release of Solo Recordings: Volume II, this fall, or next spring. Here is Sean’s review from Repentigny: Continue reading

Rick Keene’s Club Soda review

Some people are born to bake cakes. For others – mechanics may be their thing. Steve Hill of Trois Rivieres, is meant to play guitar …

At Club Soda on Saturday night, in a concert dubbed ‘A Return to Montreal‘ – Hill proved once more why he is considered to be one of the best blues guitarists in North America. How about one of the best blues guitarists period!

” The tour has be great so far …” Says Hill following his two hour performance. ” Everywhere I have played it’s been sold out and my solo performance is getting approval.”

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The Scene – Club Soda Review

Crowd: During this 2 hours one-man show, Steve Hill played mostly blues tunes from his latest album “Solo Recordings Volume 1”, attracting a crowd somewhat older than it used to with his rock band.  Club Soda was packed and Steve Hill successfully captivated the audience with an outstanding solo performance.

Technicalities: A guitar in the hands, drums and percussion at his feet, Steve Hill displayed the full array of his talent. The sound was impeccable, as you would expect for this type of set up and venue. Switching from acoustic to electric, with an unusual but extremely effective guitar playing technique, Hill definitely impressed the blues fans in the room. Continue reading

Solo recordings in Voir Newspaper

“C’est le gala de l’Adisq ce dimanche. Alain Brunet de La Presse le critique à juste titre ici. Pour ceux que ce gala rebute, il y a celui de la «musique indépendante», le Gamiq, qui se tient à la mi-novembre.

C’est aussi la période où je vous propose mon bilan musical annuel.

Voici dans le désordre, ce qui a marqué mes oreilles cette année :

2- Steve Hill, Solo recordings vol.1.  J’ai toujours apprécié le jeu de guitare de Steve Hill, un guitar hero qui serait une superstar s’il était de nationalité états-unienne… Mais Steve Hill est Québécois. “C’est le gala de l’Adisq ce dimanche. Alain Brunet de La Presse le critique à juste titre ici. Pour ceux que ce gala rebute, il y a celui de la «musique indépendante», le Gamiq, qui se tient à la mi-novembre.

C’est aussi la période où je vous propose mon bilan musical annuel.

Voici dans le désordre, ce qui a marqué mes oreilles cette année :

2- Steve Hill, Solo recordings vol.1.  J’ai toujours apprécié le jeu de guitare de Steve Hill, un guitar hero qui serait une superstar s’il était de nationalité états-unienne… Mais Steve Hill est Québécois. Continue reading

Ground Control Mag reviews Solo Recordings Vol. 1

The thing about rhetoric in the music business is that it is as important to the success of a record as the instruments which are played on it – but while the instruments can be taken at face value, the rhetoric needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Why? Well, think about it – does a record really have the power to “change your life”? Can one album really tear down the established construct in which the rest of the music industryhas been succeeding for years and prompt the business to reconfigure its practices? Can the drums on any one particular song really hit a listener in such a way that they actually feel it physically? This sort of rhetoric is instrumental in helping to paint a picture for listeners and promote an idea – and it’s fun to think it can be taken literally – but the language seldom accurately supports the experience.
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Interview with Musik Etc

Read the full article here

Quebec’s guitar hero is revisiting his roots with his latest album, Solo Recordings Volume 1. We caught up with him between two series of concerts, and he explained how he developed his solo work and the album, which has been acclaimed by the public as well as critics.

– How did the idea for a solo album come about?
Everything started with a friend’s guitar, a Gibson ES-225, perfect to play Chicago blues. I didn’t have the means to buy it from him, so he organised a solo concert in Drummondville in exchange for the guitar! It went really well, so I asked my agent to sell the solo concert concept, especially in small venues where I couldn’t play with my band. It game me the opportunity to rediscover my blues roots, something I had not done in years.
Lire l’article au complet ici

Le guitar hero Québécois effectue un retour à ses racines blues avec son plus récent album, Solo Recordings Volume 1. Entre deux séries de concerts, nous avons discuté avec lui pour mieux comprendre le développement de son jeu en solo et la création de cet album encensé par le public et la critique.

-D’où est venue l’idée de faire un album solo?

Tout a commencé avec la guitare d’un ami, une Gibson ES-225, parfaite pour faire du Chicago blues. Je n’avais pas les moyens de la lui acheter, alors il a organisé un concert solo à Drummondville en échange de la guitare! Ça s’est vraiment bien passé alors j’ai demandé à mon agent de vendre ce concept de spectacle solo, surtout pour les petites salles où je ne pouvais pas jouer avec mon groupe. Ça m’a permis de retrouver mes racines blues, ce que je n’avais pas fait depuis des années.
Continue reading

Global Montreal: Stellar Steve

I’m putting the new album by Steve Hill, his seventh, among my top five favorite blues records. It’s titled “Solo Recordings Volume One”. The album has it all, fire, smoke, smouldering coals, silk and rain clouds! It wails, it’s giddy, it cooks and it cries. It’s electric, it’s acoustic and it showcases his versatility.

The album is truly a collection of solo recordings. Steve is alone for each song, with a guitar in his hands and instruments played with his feet. In most cases, his feet are playing a bass drum and hi-hat. In other cases, for example, the Cream re-make, “Politician”, he has a coffee cup filled with change, taped to his boot.

He actually stood in the recording studio playing guitar and singing, at the same time that his feet played bass drum and hi-hat! He confessed there were sometimes balance issues, when he’d occasionally stumble backwards! It’s a cool way to do an album and the result is an irrepressibly pure performance and listening experience.

I’m putting the new album by Steve Hill, his seventh, among my top five favorite blues records. It’s titled “Solo Recordings Volume One”. The album has it all, fire, smoke, smouldering coals, silk and rain clouds! It wails, it’s giddy, it cooks and it cries. It’s electric, it’s acoustic and it showcases his versatility.

The album is truly a collection of solo recordings. Steve is alone for each song, with a guitar in his hands and instruments played with his feet. In most cases, his feet are playing a bass drum and hi-hat. In other cases, for example, the Cream re-make, “Politician”, he has a coffee cup filled with change, taped to his boot.

He actually stood in the recording studio playing guitar and singing, at the same time that his feet played bass drum and hi-hat! He confessed there were sometimes balance issues, when he’d occasionally stumble backwards! It’s a cool way to do an album and the result is an irrepressibly pure performance and listening experience.